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Estimated Nexus One Sales: Only 20,000 Units in the First Week January 13, 2010

Posted by andre in Mobile & Gadgets.
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Flurry, which monitors usage of over 10,000 developers, has published some (projected) sales numbers for Google’s and HTC’s new flag ship smart phone, the Nexus One. According to Flurry, only about 20,000 Nexus Ones were sold in its first week on the market. It was outsold by Droid by more than 12 times, myTouch 3G by 3 times and iPhone 3GS by 80 times.

“To estimate first week sales totals for the Nexus One, myTouch 3G, Droid and iPhone 3GS, Flurry detected new handsets within its system, and then made adjustments to account for varying levels of Flurry application penetration by handset. Flurry additionally crosschecked its estimates against Apple actual sales, released for iPhone 3GS, which totaled more than one million units over the three days, June 19 – 21, 2009. Flurry first week sales estimates can be found in the table below.”

Nexus One was a highly anticipated mobile phone, but Google didn’t spend millions of dollars advertising it, opting for a sort of a soft launch for the device. Verizon and Motorola, on the other hand, had spent close to 100 million dollars advertising the Droid, and if Flurry’s numbers are correct, it definitely shows the difference a good advertising campaign can make.

via Estimated Nexus One Sales: Only 20,000 Units in the First Week

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How The Different Mobile Data Syncing Services Stack Up June 9, 2009

Posted by pannet in Mobile & Gadgets.
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As the phones in our pockets become our second computers, it will become increasingly important to sync data between the two. Not just emails, but contacts, calendars, photos, music, apps, browser bookmarks, files, and more. Nearly every Web phone out there comes with at least some sort of rudimentary syncing app. Apple has MobileMe, Nokia has Ovi, Palm has Synergy, Blackberry has Internet Services, and Microsoft has My Phone.

An open-source competitor to all of these is Funambol. The startup evaluated all of the syncing services and scored them based on criteria such as how many kinds of data each one supports, cost, usability, and number of supported devices. (Full study embedded at bottom of post). It came up with a score for each out of a maximum of 40. Naturally enough, Funambol scored the highest, but if you throw that out you end up with the list below (with accompanying scores) […]

  • Nokia Ovi – 28
  • Apple MobileMe – 27
  • Palm Synergy – 26
  • Microsoft My Phone – 26
  • Vodafone Zyb – 26
  • Google Sync – 23
  • BlackBerry IS – 21
  • Yahoo! Mobile – 21
  • AT&T – 19
  • T-Mobile – 19
  • Verizon – 19

via How The Different Mobile Data Syncing Services Stack Up.

Streaming Media East: Verizon and boxee Want In To Your Living Room May 16, 2009

Posted by pannet in Internet & Communities, Multimedia.
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Keynotes from Verizon and boxee pushed forward the concept of getting online video into the living room, though each company takes a radically different approach.   [HERE IS THE VERIZON PART:]

[…] Ambeault [of Verizon] went on to discuss an upcoming service, an enhancement to FiOS TV that he says will allow access to over 7 million pieces of content. To do so, Verizon understood the need to create an interactive media guide that would allow access to all this content, which in turn should drive an uptake in digital video recorders (DVR) and increase the amount of consumption of FiOS TV in the living room. […]

At its core, the upcoming interactive media guide will be driven by a search engine, which Ambeault calls “core navigation through a plethora of content: multimedia, music and other types of content, with a robust search engine that’s much closer to an internet search tool than previous interactive TV solutions.”  The content found through the guide would play back in a variety of players, including ones that mimic traditional TV, RSS feeds, and even web video players. “These media players also have access to plug ins and applications, such as a DVD emulator,” said Ambeault, “which makes on-demand content more like a DVD experience including rich menus and other DVD-like navigation.”

Ambeault also talked to the benefit of external APIs, one of which is a desktop application which can be used to pre-populate content to the TV for a customized experience. “Rather than having to cue up content on the TV with a remote control,” said Ambeault, “which only has a few navigation buttons, we’ve used a model that allows a customer to set up content ahead of time, from work or other location, using a desktop application. So when it comes time to watch the content, the customer just sits down and watches the content.”

“We are continuing our beta testing during the early commercialization stages,” said Ambeault, “which will add podcasts (video and other downloadable media) at early tester request, and we think that newer set-top boxes may mitigate need for PC bridging. We also think there is a potential for advertising, which was not part of the original model, and we are looking into adding Facebook and Twitter widgets, allowing social networks to power discovery of content that in turn will be viewed on FiOS TV.”

http://www.streamingmedia.com/article.asp?id=11187