jump to navigation

Knocking lets you share live video between iPhones and Android smartphones | VentureBeat March 24, 2010

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

Knocking Live Video, which allows you to send live video footage from your phone’s camera to another phone, is one of the coolest iPhone apps I’ve seen recently. And today it’s launching for phones using Google’s Android operating system.

via Knocking lets you share live video between iPhones and Android smartphones | VentureBeat.

Gartner Outlines 10 Mobile Technologies to Watch in 2010 and 2011 March 24, 2010

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

STAMFORD, Conn., March 24, 2010 —  

Gartner, Inc. has identified 10 mobile technologies that will evolve significantly through 2011 in ways that will impact short-term mobile strategies and policies. Investments in mobile applications and technologies will increase through 2011 as organizations emerge from the recession and ramp up both business-to-employee (B2E) and business-to-consumer (B2C) mobile spending.”We are highlighting these 10 mobile technologies that should be on every organization’s radar screen,” said Nick Jones, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. “These mobile technologies were selected because they will evolve in ways that affect corporate strategies, significant numbers of customers or employees will adopt or expect them, or they will address particular mobile challenges that organizations will face through 2011.”

The 10 mobile technologies to watch in 2010 and 2011 include:

(more…)

Now you can shop for Android apps without Android | VentureBeat March 17, 2010

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Google has limited app discovery in its Android Market store to Android-powered devices. That makes it hard for people who don’t own a phone, or who want something faster and bigger than a Droid screen, to search for and learn about apps.

AppStoreHQ has solved the problem with a browser-based Android directory at AppStoreHQ.com/android-apps. The directory works like AppStoreHQ’s iPhone directory.

The company has also made it possible for other sites to tap into their Android listings. You can see the API-like info at DroidDog and AndroidTapp.

AppStoreHQ founder Chris DeVore sent me this list of features:

  • Keyword search and category browse for any app in Android Market.
  • Web-based profile pages for each app that include price, description, screenshots and recent user feedback.
  • Direct buy links for Android device users.
  • For Web visitors, barcode-based buy links and an email-to-phone option.
  • Easy social share actions for any Android app via Twitter, Facebook and email.
  • “Hottest Apps” rankings based on worldwide Android app mentions on blogs and Twitter,with results updated several times a day.

Seattle-based AppStoreHQ is run by DeVore, and funded by Founder’s Co-op, also in Seattle. The company won Best Mobile Service Startup at VentureBeat’s MobileBeat 2009 conference.

via Now you can shop for Android apps without Android | VentureBeat.

Gartner Says Consumers Will Spend $6.2 Billion in Mobile Application Stores in 2010 January 18, 2010

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

Consumers will spend $6.2 billion in 2010 in mobile application stores while advertising revenue is expected to generate $0.6 billion worldwide, according to Gartner, Inc. Analysts said mobile application stores will exceed 4.5 billion downloads in 2010, eight out of ten of which will be free to end users.

Gartner forecasts worldwide downloads in mobile application stores to surpass 21.6 billion by 2013 (see Table 1). Free downloads will account for 82 per cent of all downloads in 2010, and will account for 87 per cent of downloads in 2013.

“As smartphones grow in popularity and application stores become the focus for several players in the value chain, more consumers will experiment with application downloads,” said Stephanie Baghdassarian, research director at Gartner. “Games remain the No. 1 application, and mobile shopping, social networking, utilities and productivity tools continue to grow and attract increasing amounts of money.”


Table 1
Mobile Application Stores’ Number of Downloads and Revenue, Worldwide

2009 2010 2013
Downloads (in M) 2,516 4,507 21,646
Total revenue (in $M) 4,237.80 6,770.40 29,479.30

Source: Gartner (December 2009

An application can be free because the developer is offering it at no cost to the consumer while charging for other things within the application. There are also applications that are free to use but that charge for physical goods that you can have delivered through the application. There are many applications that are free to users and derive their revenue from advertising. This can be done with banners as well as full page advertising between game levels for instance.

Worldwide mobile application stores’ download revenue exceeded $4.2 billion in 2009 and will grow to $29.5 billion by the end of 2013. This revenue forecast includes end-user spending on paid-for applications and advertising-sponsored free applications. Advertising-sponsored mobile applications will generate almost 25 per cent of mobile application stores revenue by 2013.

High-end smartphone users today tend to be early adopters of new mobile applications and more trustful of billing mechanisms, so they will pay for applications that can meet their needs. Average smartphone users will become less tech-savvy as smartphones come down in price to have a mass market appeal and these users will be more reluctant to pay for applications.

“Growth in smartphone sales will not necessarily mean that consumers will spend more money, but it will widen the addressable market for an offering that will be advertising-funded,” Ms Baghdassarian added. “The value chain of the application stores will evolve as rules are set and broken in an attempt to find the most profitable business model for all parties involved.”

“Application stores will be a core focus throughout 2010 for the mobile industry and applications themselves will help determine the winner among mobile devices platforms,” said Carolina Milanesi, research director at Gartner. “Consumers will have a wide choice of stores and will seek the ones that make it easy for them to discover applications they are interested in and make it easy to pay for them when they have to. Developers will have to consider carefully not only which platform to support but also which store to promote their applications in.”

Additional information is available in the Gartner report “Dataquest Insight: Application Stores; The Revenue Opportunity Beyond the Hype”. The report is available on Gartner’s website at http://www.gartner.com/resId=1257213.

via Gartner Says Consumers Will Spend $6.2 Billion in Mobile Application Stores in 2010.

Social Medial World Forum and Mobile Social Media Europe, London | mobile zeitgeist January 7, 2010

Posted by hruf in Internet & Communities, Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , , ,
add a comment

Social Media World Forum Europe –  15/16th March 2010

Venue – Olympia, Earls Court, London

Social Media World Forum is now firmly established as Europe’s leading social media event. With 5 supporting conference streams, over 300 speakers, free to attend workshops and exhibitions, the show is a must attend on the social media calendar.

The show covers the latest in brand engagement using social media, monitoring social media campaigns, brand building using social media, b2b social networks, social media & pr, virtual currencies, gaming, applications and many more.

The Social Media World Forum is part of the Social Media World Series and will also take place in North America in June and Asia in September 2010.

Agenda

Speakers

Online-Registration

Mobile Social Media Europe –  15th March 2010

Venue – Olympia, Earls Court, London

Mobile Social Media – examines the latest in social media apps for mobile, what leading mobile social networks are planning, and how marketers are gaining a voice in the conversations taking place on mobile social networks. It examines consumers interacting with brands on mobile social networks, defining mobile social network ad revenue, the latest in location aware applications, services and offers and defining the mobile social networking market.

Mobile Social Media is part of the Social Media World Forum.

Conference Programme

Speakers

Online-Registration

Early booking discount (25% off) for both events valid until 15th January 2010.

via Social Medial World Forum and Mobile Social Media Europe, London | mobile zeitgeist.

Fandango comes to Android, Babylon makes its way to BlackBerry January 7, 2010

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

We’re rolling two separate announcements into one post, if you don’t mind.

Fandango this morning announced the official release of its free app for the Android platform, enabling owners of Google’s Nexus One and other devices that run Android to check out movies showtimes and more on the go. The news comes a couple of weeks after the company put out a beta release of the Android app.

Mobile movie fans can use the app to find movies playing nearby by using Android’s GPS feature and connect straight to Google Maps for driving directions to the theatres, watch trailers, view fan ratings and buy tickets for more than 16,000 movie screens. Fandango is waiving the service fee for tickets purchased through the app from now until March 7, 2010.

Translation and dictionary software maker Babylon, on the other hand, has today released its application for BlackBerry. At least, we’ll take their word for it, since we couldn’t find it in the App World catalog yet.

Conceivably, it’s only offering the application to large-volume Babylon-Enterprise corporate customers who will now be able to host Babylon’s dictionary application locally on their own BB smartphones.

Babylon says it is currently in the process of developing an application for the private sector as well, and expects it to be available within a few months.

via Fandango comes to Android, Babylon makes its way to BlackBerry.

How Prices Compare on Different App Stores – GigaOM December 30, 2009

Posted by pannet in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

With an increasing number of companies launching mobile app stores, we [GigaOM] decided it was time to compare them. We wanted to find out the average cost of a paid application on various stores.

We asked our friends at Mobclix, a Palo Alto, Calif.-based startup that offers mobile analytics and runs a mobile ad exchange, if they could help. They crunched some numbers and came back with some surprising findings. For example: BlackBerry paid apps are among the most expensive, followed by Microsoft, Android and the iPhone OS platform. Nokia Ovi paid apps were among the cheapest.

via How Prices Compare on Different App Stores – GigaOM.

Droid clobbers other Android phones in Xmas app downloads December 29, 2009

Posted by andre in Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Droid-v-Others-Downloads1On Christmas Day, the number of Android app downloads from the new Droid phones roughly equaled the number of downloads from all leading Android phones combined, according to the latest report from app market analysts Flurry.

T-Mobile’s myTouch 3G and G1, and the HTC Hero sold by Sprint, totaled roughly as many apps as those downloaded the Verizon/Motorola Droid phones on December 25.

Is this the new landscape, or was it just a one-day fluke? Flurry’s head of marketing, Peter Farago, emailed in response: “In our estimation, Droid numbers will continue to drive a larger share of downloads for the foreseable future until another Android handset can displace its position as the fastest-selling Android phone. Also, we have to remember that this is the most marketed Android phone to date, and on Verizon, which has 70 million subscribers.”

Still, Apple’s App Store continues to dominate the app market. iPhone and iPod Touch users downloads thirteen times as many apps in December as all Android phone users combined, Flurry says. And Apple’s December download volume will be 51 percent higher than November’s, if Flurry’s calculations are correct. By contrast, Android Market downloads only increased 22 percent from November to December.

So while the Droid is the hotter phone right now in terms of buzz, the numbers point to Apple’s continuing dominance of the app world going into 2010.

via Droid clobbers other Android phones in Xmas app downloads | VentureBeat

Will the Mobile Web Kill Off the App Store? | Gadget Lab | Wired.com December 19, 2009

Posted by pannet in Internet & Communities, Mobile & Gadgets.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

The debate over the longevity of native software continues. Mozilla, creator of Firefox, claims that its new browser for smartphones will contribute to the death of smartphone app stores.

Scheduled to begin appearing on devices at the end of this year, the Firefox mobile browser, code-named Fennec, will be packed with features to make it the closest thing yet to a real, desktop-class browser. (Wired.com’s Mike Calore has a detailed look at Fennec.) Mozilla claims it will have the fastest JavaScript engine of any mobile browser, allowing developers to produce HTML- and JavaScript-coded apps for Fennec rather than for multiple smartphone platforms, such as iPhone OS, Google Android or Windows Mobile.

“In the interim period, apps will be very successful,” said Jay Sullivan, vice president of Mozilla’s mobile division, in an interview with PC Pro. “Over time, the web will win because it always does.”

Web proponents such as Mozilla and Google dream that internet standards will enable any app to run on any device, just as Java proponents touted a “write once, run anywhere” vision in the 1990s. Similarly, Adobe’s Flash emerged as a cross-platform environment for creating animations, games and apps for the web. But many consumers and developers have complained that Java and Flash exhibit bugs, performance problems and security vulnerabilities, among other issues. And Java’s promises of universality didn’t quite work out, because different implementations of the Java virtual machine (not to mention wildly varying hardware capabilities) mean that, even today, Java coders need to rework their apps for each target device.

But web proponents maintain that the wide acceptance of next-generation internet standards, particularly HTML5, will win out where Java failed.

It’s a tempting vision. Currently, when deciding whether to buy a Mac or a PC, an Xbox 360 or a PlayStation 3, or an iPhone or a Droid, you need to consider which applications you’ll be able to run on each one. If programmers head in the direction of the web, then ideally you’ll be able to gain access to any application regardless of the computer or smartphone you own.

Google is attempting to lead the web movement. The search giant is pushing its web-only regime with Chrome OS, its browser-based operating system for netbooks that will run only web applications. Also, in July, Google’s engineering vice president and developer evangelist Vic Gundotra said in a conference that mobile app stores have no future.

“Many, many applications can be delivered through the browser and what that does for our costs is stunning,” Gundotra was quoted in a Financial Times report. “We believe the web has won and over the next several years, the browser, for economic reasons almost, will become the platform that matters and certainly that’s where Google is investing.”

But iPhone developers and analysts polled in July by Wired.com explained the problems with current web technologies, and some highlighted the merits of native-app architecture.

Interpet analyst Michael Gartenberg noted that many iPhone apps are a combination of native and web technologies, because many apps download or share data through the internet. He said it’s beneficial for the apps to be native, because they’re programmed to take full advantage of the iPhone’s hardware.

“It’s odd that Google feels the need to position as one versus the other,” Gartenberg said in July. “That’s last century thinking…. It’s not about web applications or desktop applications but integrating the cloud into these applications that are on both my phone and the PC. Ultimately, it’s about offering the best of both worlds to create the best experience for consumers — not forcing them to choose one or the other.”

With Firefox’s mobile browser rolling out soon, we have yet to see how consumers and developers react to Mozilla’s attempt to spark a web-only exodus.

via Will the Mobile Web Kill Off the App Store? | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

iPhone developers abandoning app model for HTML5? December 16, 2009

Posted by hruf in Mobile & Gadgets, Programming.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

Lots of iPhone application developers are frustrated with the process to get new apps into your hands. It takes about three weeks lately for an app to get approved and into the iTunes store.

Lately I’ve noticed that some developers are avoiding building apps and, instead, are building custom web pages that are designed specifically for the iPhone. I’m not the only one, Marshall Kirkpatrick, over at ReadWriteWeb is seeing the same trend and yesterday featured several services that are building iPhone web experiences but not apps.

Examples you might be already using are Twitter’s mobile site, or Techmeme’s mobile site.

But yesterday another one came along from Nextstop, which is a cool new app for sharing cool things to do near you (great for travelers to check out) and they, too, decided on HTML5 instead of doing an iPhone app. So, I visited them in their San Francisco offices and learned why they made the choices they did, got a demo of the new mobile site they built using HTML5, and also talked about what their view of what’s happening in the larger mobile industry is.

Some reasons Nextstop likes HTML5:

1. Rapid iteration. If they code a new feature tonight, you get it tonight. No waiting three weeks for you to get their latest.
2. It prepares their systems for building a native app. Why? Because apps can include a Safari browser instance inside, so all of this work is reusable, even if they do a native app.
3. It’s easier to build and debug because you don’t need to do a lot of specialized coding to make the native app work properly.
4. It fits into the greater web easier for users. In an iPhone app it can be jarring to take users out to a web browser, but if they already are in the browser they are used to going to other pages and back again using Safari’s navigation.

Anyway, if you want to learn more about the latest thinking of iPhone app developers, this is a good video to watch.

via iPhone developers abandoning app model for HTML5?.