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Gartner Highlights Five Issues Enterprises Should Examine With Upcoming Launch of Windows 7 October 15, 2009

Posted by hruf in Enterprise 2.0, Internet & Communities.
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The move to Microsoft’s latest operating system (OS), Windows 7, is all but inevitable for most organizations, and Gartner, Inc. has highlighted five key issues enterprises should examine as this new OS hits the market.[…]

Gartner analysts said that while it’s nearly inevitable for enterprises to move to Windows 7, this does not mean that the PC industry will see a significant boost in PC sales immediately.[…]

Five issues that enterprises should examine before they move to Windows 7 include:

Plan to be Off Windows XP by Year-End 2012 — Microsoft will support Windows XP with security fixes into April of 2014, but past experience has shown that independent software vendors (ISVs) will stop testing much earlier. “New releases of critical business software will require Windows 7 long before Microsoft support for Windows XP ends,” said Steve Kleynhans, research vice president at Gartner. “Organizations that get all of their users off Windows XP by the end of 2012 will avoid significant potential problems.”

Start Working on Migration Projects Now — The typical organization requires 12 to 18 months waiting, testing, and planning before it can start deploying a new client OS. There is a lot of work to be done in preparation, and delays in getting started will only result in added costs later.

Don’t Wait for Windows 7 SP1 to Begin Testing and Deployment — Many organizations say they plan to wait until SP1 ships to begin testing and deploying a new client OS. Gartner analysts suggest starting work now (especially if companies have skipped Windows Vista), but are planning to switch to SP1 before their actual rollout.

Don’t Skip Windows 7 — Gartner categorizes Windows 7 as a “polishing” release on top of the architectural change that the Windows Vista “plumbing” release delivered. Gartner analysts said polishing releases should never be skipped. “While organizations that skipped Windows 2000 and waited for XP had some problems spanning the gap, organizations that adopted Windows 2000 and tried to skip Windows XP, waiting for Vista, had a much harder time,” Mr. Silver said.

Budget Carefully — Migration Costs to Vary Significantly Gartner’s model shows that migration costs could be $1,035 to $1,930 per user to move from Windows XP to Windows 7, and $339 to $510 per user to move from Windows Vista to Windows 7 depending on an organization’s approach.

Gartner’s Windows 7 Special Report includes Gartner’s latest research around Windows 7, examining such issues as when to move to Windows 7 and how much it will cost. The section also includes a link to the Gartner Webinar focused on Windows 7, as well as a video with additional Gartner commentary. This site is on Gartner’s Website at www.gartner.com/windows7.

via Gartner Highlights Five Issues Enterprises Should Examine With Upcoming Launch of Windows 7.

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